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Dr. Marlow Ediger

May 1, 2018

    Dr. Marlow Ediger was born to Jacob and Marie Regier Ediger on October 10, 1927 on a farm near Inman. He attended and graduated from Turkey Creek Elementary School and Inman High School in McPherson County. He completed his first two years of college study in education at Bethel College before transferring to Emporia State University. Marlow taught at Sand Creek and Country Side Elementary Schools in Marion County and served as Elementary School Principal in Lincolnville.  He married Mary Duerksen of Goessel on June 2, 1957 at Alexanderwohl Mennonite Church celebrating over 60 years of marriage. They were blessed with three children— Bruce, Kent and wife Diana, and Diane Threlkeld and husband Joseph (who faithfully and frequently visited), and six grandchildren, Van, Sam, Henry, Harper, Jansen and Everett.  He was preceeded in death by his parents, his sister Mildred who encouraged him and financially contributed to his education, and his brother and friend Eldo. Surviving are Mary his wife, their three children, grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

            In his own words, Marlow shares memories of his early life: “I was blessed to have been raised in the Hoffnungsau Mennonite Church and Community. My early duties and interests while growing up on a farm was to help with farm chores and tend to my 4H projects of registered Milking Shorthorn Cattle which were exhibited at the County and at the State Fair in Hutchinson. While in high school, I received Highly Superior ratings on my baritone horn solos at the regional and district music contests. The state music contests were canceled due to national conservation efforts of World War Two. I also played baritone horn solos later at church, civic events, and college pep band, quitting due to handicaps in handling and playing my very favorite instrument which I still own. While in high school, I was a member of 4H and honored to serve as President for one year, served as Vice President and President of the local Future Farmers of America chapter, and received the State Farmer Degree from FFA, which was open to two per cent of the FFA membership in Kansas. I was also fortunate to be awarded the Union Pacific Railroad scholarship in Agriculture in 1946. When I was eleven, my mother had a devastating stroke leaving her paralyzed and unable to walk or communicate. My father, sister, brother, and myself took care of her in our home until she died 22 years later in 1961.”

 

            Graduating from Emporia State University with both the Baccalaurate in 1958 and a Master’s Degree in 1960, and then completing Doctoral Degree requirements in 1963 at the University of Denver, he became full Professor at Truman State University in 1962, serving there for thirty years as Professor. During this time, while at TSU, he served as Vice President and President of the local chapter of Phi Delta Kappa. He also served two years as Vice President and President of the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors.

A highlight of his career was to serve two years as teacher and relief worker in the Holy Land. He saw the Mount of Olives and the Walled City of Jerusalem almost every day. “What a rich experience!” Marlow used to say to family and friends about his time in the Middle East.

 

            Marlow was a life member of the National Education Association (NEA), State Teachers Association, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD), International Literacy Association (ILA), National Council Social Studies (NCSS), National Council Teachers of English (NCTE), and National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). He had upwards of one thousand written manuscripts published in education in six continents. He also had 31 co-authored textbooks published for University use, having previously served as classroom teacher and school administrator. 

Marlow would like to thank the following faithful visitors, in particular in that “I was sick and ye visited me”:

             Wesley Ediger, nephew and son of his late brother Eldo, Abe Schmidt, John and Joan Stretcher, Reverend Scott McGinnis, and above all “my wonderful wife Mary. Thank you and may God bless you and keep you! May He lift his countenance upon you and grant you peace. May we meet again with the Lord being our Shepherd. I shall not want.”

 

Memorial service will be 11:00 a.m., Saturday, May 5, 2018 at First Presbyterian Church 900 Columbus Newton, Kansas with The Reverend Scott McGinnis presiding.  Private family interment will be in the Alexanderwohl Cemetery Rural Goessel Kansas.

 

Memorials in Lieu of flowers are asked to be directed to MCC or First Presbyterian Church in care of Petersen Funeral Home 215 North Main Newton, Kansas 67114

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6 thoughts on “Dr. Marlow Ediger

  1. Mary and family,
    I’m so very sorry for your loss.
    Sincerely,
    Rhonda Tillberg

  2. Mary & Family,
    So sorry to learn of Marlow’s passing. Fond memories of you both in Kirksville Presbyterian Church. God Bless You.
    Love, Linda Hudnall

  3. Mary & Family,
    So sorry to learn of Marlow’s passing. Fond memories of you both in Kirksville Prebyterian Church. God Bless You.
    Love,
    Linda Hudnall

  4. Dr. Ediger had a positive influence on both my wife and I. We are borh retired educators.and former students. Sorry to hear of his passing, but thankful for the opportunity to learn from him.

  5. Mary and family,
    I am sorry for your loss. I worked for Dr. Edigar in the 1970’s as I was a student at Northeast Missouri State (TSU) studying to be a teacher. Little did he know the impact. I served 37 in the educational field as teacher, principal and superintendent.

  6. My condolences, Mary, to you and your family. Marlow was a great educator, professor, and colleague. I learned much from him. Janice Grow

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